FANDOM


by T.A. Saunders ©2012 v1.0

Summary

In order to facilitate fairness during our Random Encounters and GM Events, our ops utilize a special dice system. Because our channel is semi-free form, the use of dice is limited to these sorts of events and not a part of every day role-play. There will be in the near future an optional dice combat system made available for players who do not wish to solve in character conflicts by free form combat. The owner and operators of this channel view dice regulation as a guideline so it serves not to take the public presentation of these rules as a hard and immovable way to look at game governance. These rules are only for channel operators and contributors to use during events to make actions binding and unbiased. Channel players at no time are allowed to use these rules without permission from an op or the channel owner. Players are allowed to use the bot’s dice sparingly; anybody caught spamming dice, will be warned once, then banned on a second infraction.

Perception, Ability, and Skill Checks

Sometimes a character will need to check to see if they can do something, guess something or do something out of the ordinary. Because a semi-free form role-playing system does not have hard ability scores to check against, we utilize a percentage to see if something is successful or not. The GM at the time must assign a percentage to whatever feat is being attempted. There are modifiers that can be assigned by the GM as well as modifiers for class/race. Because we allow ‘outland’ characters into our game, it should be noted that a GM can assign modifiers for them as well, but will not benefit from canon race/class bonuses. The exception to this rule is an outland character that takes on a canon class.
The dice for perception and ability checks is always a straight percentage with a roll of 1% being the best and 100% being the worst. A roll of 100% (without modifiers) signifies a critical failure of some kind, ex. Sam the Swordsman is attempting to climb a chain faster than a trapped room is filling up with water. On a roll of a 100%, the chain would break and Sam would fall into the water. On a 1%, Sam would climb the chain with ease and stay ahead of the water.
Some people might be confused by this, but it helps to think of the roll as a percent rather than a simple pass/fail roll. A percent chance for something to happen or work correctly makes more sense, because there are degrees to which a character can succeed at something. Sometimes they might have amazing success, other times they might have just barely made the check and struggle to accomplish what it was they were trying to do. It’s important for players to not know what that percentage is, because it allows a GM leeway in how they might rule what effect the percentile roll had.
Canon characters have skills that have a set percentage to function. These work in every way like perception/ability checks but the player does know his/her percent chance at success. This sort of information is generally harmless for a player to know and is made available for their benefit. Skill checks generally do not have modifiers but can in special instances or if the standing GM feels one is warranted. For example, if a thief tries to hide in shadows at high noon, in an area that has sparse cover, there could be a penalty to the check. In all cases, the GM has the final say in how a skill check is handled.

Combat Dice

Combat dice are handled only slightly differently than ability checks. Depending on your class, you will have a base percentage to hit your target(s). The chart below explains what class types use what hit type and what that base percentage for that hit type is.


Class Hit Type

Base Percentage

Engineer Primary : Ranged, Secondary : Melee 50% - 50%
Knight Primary : Melee, Secondary : Spell (except Cavalier) 50% - 65%
Mage Spell 65%
Occultist Spell 75%
Priest Primary : Spell, Secondary : Melee 85% - 50%
Rogue Primary : Melee, Secondary : Range (Except Bard, Spell Hit used) 75% - 50%
Scout Primary : Ranged, Secondary : Melee, Tertiary (Ranger) : Spell 75% - 65% - (R) 65%
Seer Spell 75%
Warrior Primary : Melee, Secondary : Ranged 60% - 60%
Will-Shaper Spell 75%
This base percentage indicates the possibility of your character hitting the target. In the cases of dual classes, you use the base percentage for the class function you’re using. If you’re playing a ranger/mage dual class, you use the ranger base percentage and bonuses for ranger divine magic, if you’re casting a mage spell then you use the mage base and percentage.  
Once you have your base percentage, you begin adding up all your class and race bonuses to your base to get your total hit percentage. This total hit percentage should always be tagged in combat posts you make as to to make the GM’s job of determining whether you have hit or not easier.
Things to remember to add together when calculating your total hit: 
  • Base Hit %
  • Shared Class Bonuses
  • Class Specific Bonuses
  • Racial Bonuses
  • Weapon Bonuses
  • Bonuses from Tattoos, Buffs, etc.
With the total hit calculated, you can then easily add it to combat posts you make, such as in the following example: 
  • Farmer_Bill charges the giant two-headed skunk with his Pitchfork of Fury, attempting to drive the mighty weapon into the smelly creature’s flank. [Total Hit +105%, 1 attack per round, Armor Rating -60%]  
This information allows the GM to calculate the final hit score you need, based on your total hit, versus your target’s total armor rating. Armor Rating is tabulated in much the same way your hit percentage is, but we’ll look at that later. Using the above example, Farmer Bill has a +105 melee hit, versus the giant two-headed skunk’s -50% armor rating. That means: +105% melee hit -50% armor rating for the skunk = 55% chance to hit the skunk.  
In this example, let’s assume the GM rolls the percent to hit and 41 is the result of the d100 roll. This means the Farmer Bill successfully stabbed the giant two-headed skunk in the flank. It should be noted that the lower the result the better the hit is. On a result of 1 a perfect result is attained and 2-5 indicate a critical result. Conversely, a result of a 100, regardless of bonus percentage is always a critical fail.  
As mentioned previously, Armor Rating should also be always tagged in the combat post as well. Using the above we know that Farmer Bill’s Armor Rating is -60% This means that the skunk’s hit roll is negatively affected by the protection Bill has and as a result, has less of a chance to hit him. Since Bill attacked, we will now look at what happens when the skunk attacks as part of the GM’s resolve to combat.  
  • The giant two-headed skunk is furious. The wound sends the mutated creature into a berserk rage that launches the incensed creature upon Farmer Bill, shredding him with slashing claws. The attack rends Bill’s left arm and shoulder wide open. 
The GM makes this resolve by rolling the hit roll in the ops channel. Knowing Bill’s armor rating and putting it against the Skunk’s hit (monsters are classed like people for purposes of hit, but may or may not have said class’s abilities). Let’s say that the Skunk had a 88% chance to hit and scored a 82 on the roll. This would be considered a hit, but not as severe as it could be because it was close to missing. 
When tabulating your Armor Rating, remember to include the following items:*Shared Class Bonuses
  • Class Specific Bonuses
  • Racial Bonuses
  • Armor and Item Bonuses
  • Bonuses from Tattoos, Buffs, etc.
Remember when tabulating Armor Rating you add up all the numbers, but the number itself should be posted as a negative number! Posting an Armor Rating as a positive number could be construed as a penalty. Additionally, people wearing no armor at all and not having any racial advantage for additional protection have an Armor Rating of 0%.  
Mystic Defense works in the same way as Armor Rating, but addresses a character’s ability to resist or partially resist certain magical, illusionary, mental (such as will-shaping) or certain supernatural attacks. And like Armor rating, all characters start with a Mystic Defense of 0%, save Dwarves who have a -30% Mystic Defense and Voraath, who have a -20% Mystic Defense vs. Magic Diseases and Toxins. This rating can be improved with certain items, tattoos and spells.  
Using the above example of Farmer Bill and the Skunk, Bill is now confronted with the Skunk’s Magic Stench Musk. Farmer Bill’s Mystic Defense is -50% thanks to his Pitchfork of Fury, which is crafted from a magic-nullifying metal, known as Starmetal. This means that the skunk’s hit roll is negatively affected by the resistance Bill has and as a result, has less of a chance to hit him. Since Bill attacked, we will now look at what happens when the skunk attacks as part of the GM’s resolve to combat.  
  • The giant two-headed skunk turns around quickly and sprays Farmer Bill with its Magic Stench Musk. The fine mist covers Bill completely in its horrible stink.  
The GM makes this resolve by rolling the hit roll in the ops channel. Knowing Bill’s armor rating and putting it against the Skunk’s hit (monsters are classed like people for purposes of hit, but may or may not have said class’s abilities). Let’s say that the Skunk had a 101% chance to hit and scored a 65 on the roll. This would be considered a miss in this example.
+101% spell hit for the skunk, -50% Mystic Defense for Bill = 51% chance for the stink to land on Bill.  
The GM makes this resolve by rolling the hit roll in the ops channel. Knowing Bill’s mystic defense and putting it against the Skunk’s spell hit (monsters are classed like people for purposes of hit, but may or may not have said class’s abilities). As mentioned above, that would be a miss for the skunk’s musk, though the GM could also rule because it was an area of effect attack, Bill would have taken a partial hit. This is GM discretion in all cases. 
When tabulating your Mystic Defense, remember to include the following items:
  • Shared Class Bonuses
  • Class Specific Bonuses
  • Racial Bonuses
  • Armor and Item Bonuses
  • Bonuses from Tattoos, Buffs, etc.
Remember when tabulating Mystic Defense you add up all the numbers, but the number itself should be posted as a negative number! Posting a Mystic Defense as a positive number could be construed as a penalty. Remember, people not wearing protective items or armor that enhance Mystic Defense and not having any racial advantage for additional protection have a Mystic Defense of 0%.

Dealing Damage

This dice system has been designed to decide how hits land and how certain skills and abilities work. It is a flaw of a fully free-form system that players will sometimes not take a hit no matter what happens and attempt to shrug off everything they’re hit with. In respect to damage, it is generally left to the GM how hard something hits a character, including the types and sorts of wounds and the player is given the opportunity to play whatever their character’s reaction to that damage is, without the arbitration of dice. This helps keep some of the free-form spirit in the combat, without weighing down the GM with more dice to roll to figure out the damage.  
The exception to this is Catastrophic Damage. In certain situations, there is simply no way for a character to survive if they encounter a no way out scenario. This could be anything from a building falling on the character, being plunged into lava, or dumped off the side of a moving airship.  
When deciding Catastrophic Damage, all characters are given a base 3% to survive. As with other ability checks this can be modified to suit a situation if the GM chooses. If the character makes the roll, they survive out of some miracle of events, though they will invariably be severely injured and require immediate medical attention. A character could still die even if they make this roll, if aforementioned medical attention is not forthcoming. Those who fail this roll are slain and can be resurrected normally. 

Conclusion

This dice system has been in game testing for several years, however as improvements and errata are constantly being sought out. As such, additions and changes can be made at any time. It is also important to reinforce that these rules exist in their current state to allow for the spirit of free-form role-playing to exist, without some of the lack of fairness a fully free-form system presents. Likewise this is not an attempt to make a fully dice-based game, though the groundwork for such a thing exists with these rules. As stated in the beginning of this article, dice for our game are a guideline, not the hard and fast rule. 

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.